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 Date Table Function F_TABLE_DATE
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Michael Valentine Jones
Yak DBA Kernel (pronounced Colonel)

USA
7020 Posts

Posted - 02/09/2006 :  21:48:05  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Function F_TABLE_DATE is a multistatement table-valued function that returns a table containing a variety of attributes of all dates from @FIRST_DATE through @LAST_DATE. In short, it’s a calendar table function.

This just kept growing as I adding more and more items. I think this is finished enough to share, since it is up to around 65 columns.

The general operation of the function and the contents of the output columns are documented in the code. If you any questions, post them here, and I'll respond.

If you spot any problems or bugs or have any suggestions, I would appreciate any feedback.

Edit:
Modified 2006-07-07 to support systems running a non-US English DATEFORMAT. Also added a checksum test to the script to confirm that results are the same for different date formats. This change does not convert the various output formats to local formats; it only makes the function produce the same output no matter what the DATEFORMAT is.

If you have the earlier version, you may want to get this updated code.

Edit (2012-07-05):
Corrected error in contents of column DATE_FORMAT_YYYY_M_D. It was returning the date in format YYYY/D/M, instead of YYYY/M/D. Error was reported by MorrisK in post on this thread on 02/08/2012 15:40:08, but I just noticed his post today.




if exists (select * from dbo.sysobjects 
where id = object_id(N'[dbo].[F_TABLE_DATE]')
and xtype in (N'FN', N'IF', N'TF'))
drop function [dbo].[F_TABLE_DATE]
GO
SET QUOTED_IDENTIFIER OFF 
GO
SET ANSI_NULLS OFF 
GO
create function dbo.F_TABLE_DATE
(
	@FIRST_DATE		datetime,
	@LAST_DATE		datetime
)
/*
Function: dbo.F_TABLE_DATE

This function returns a date table containing all dates
from @FIRST_DATE through @LAST_DATE inclusive.
@FIRST_DATE must be less than or equal to @LAST_DATE.
The valid date range is 1754-01-01 through 9997-12-31.
If any input parameters are invalid, the fuction will produce
an error.

The table returned by F_TABLE_DATE contains a date and
columns with many calculated attributes of that date.
It is designed to make it convenient to get various commonly
needed date attributes without having to program and test
the same logic in many applications.

F_TABLE_DATE is primarily intended to load a permanant
date table, but it can be used directly by an application
when the date range needed falls outside the range loaded
in a permanant table.

If F_TABLE_DATE is used to load a permanant table, the create
table code can be copied from this function.  For a permanent
date table, most columns should be indexed to produce the
best application performance.


Column Descriptions
------------------------------------------------------------------


DATE_ID               
	Unique ID = Days since 1753-01-01

DATE                            
	Date at Midnight(00:00:00.000)

NEXT_DAY_DATE                   
	Next day after DATE at Midnight(00:00:00.000)
	Intended to be used in queries against columns
	containing datetime values (1998-12-13 14:35:16)
	that need to join to a DATE.
	Example:

	from
		MyTable a
		join
		DATE b
		on	a.DateTimeCol >= b. DATE	and
			a.DateTimeCol < b.NEXT_DAY_DATE

YEAR                            
	Year number in format YYYY, Example = 2005

YEAR_QUARTER                    
	Year and Quarter number in format YYYYQ, Example = 20052

YEAR_MONTH                      
	Year and Month number in format YYYYMM, Example = 200511

YEAR_DAY_OF_YEAR                
	Year and Day of Year number in format YYYYDDD, Example = 2005364

QUARTER                         
	Quarter number in format Q, Example = 4

MONTH                           
	Month number in format MM, Example = 11

DAY_OF_YEAR                     
	Day of Year number in format DDD, Example = 362

DAY_OF_MONTH                    
	Day of Month number in format DD, Example = 31

DAY_OF_WEEK                     
	Day of week number, Sun=1, Mon=2, Tue=3, Wed=4, Thu=5, Fri=6, Sat=7

YEAR_NAME                       
	Year name text in format YYYY, Example = 2005

YEAR_QUARTER_NAME               
	Year Quarter name text in format YYYY QQ, Example = 2005 Q3

YEAR_MONTH_NAME                 
	Year Month name text in format YYYY MMM, Example = 2005 Mar

YEAR_MONTH_NAME_LONG            
	Year Month long name text in format YYYY MMMMMMMMM,
	Example = 2005 September

QUARTER_NAME                    
	Quarter name text in format QQ, Example = Q1

MONTH_NAME                      
	Month name text in format MMM, Example = Mar

MONTH_NAME_LONG                 
	Month long name text in format MMMMMMMMM, Example = September

WEEKDAY_NAME                    
	Weekday name text in format DDD, Example = Tue

WEEKDAY_NAME_LONG               
	Weekday long name text in format DDDDDDDDD, Example = Wednesday

START_OF_YEAR_DATE              
	First Day of Year that DATE is in

END_OF_YEAR_DATE                
	Last Day of Year that DATE is in

START_OF_QUARTER_DATE           
	First Day of Quarter that DATE is in

END_OF_QUARTER_DATE             
	Last Day of Quarter that DATE is in

START_OF_MONTH_DATE             
	First Day of Month that DATE is in

END_OF_MONTH_DATE               
	Last Day of Month that DATE is in

*** Start and End of week columns allow selections by week
*** for any week start date needed.

START_OF_WEEK_STARTING_SUN_DATE 
	First Day of Week starting Sunday that DATE is in

END_OF_WEEK_STARTING_SUN_DATE   
	Last Day of Week starting Sunday that DATE is in

START_OF_WEEK_STARTING_MON_DATE 
	First Day of Week starting Monday that DATE is in

END_OF_WEEK_STARTING_MON_DATE   
	Last Day of Week starting Monday that DATE is in

START_OF_WEEK_STARTING_TUE_DATE 
	First Day of Week starting Tuesday that DATE is in

END_OF_WEEK_STARTING_TUE_DATE   
	Last Day of Week starting Tuesday that DATE is in

START_OF_WEEK_STARTING_WED_DATE 
	First Day of Week starting Wednesday that DATE is in

END_OF_WEEK_STARTING_WED_DATE   
	Last Day of Week starting Wednesday that DATE is in

START_OF_WEEK_STARTING_THU_DATE 
	First Day of Week starting Thursday that DATE is in

END_OF_WEEK_STARTING_THU_DATE   
	Last Day of Week starting Thursday that DATE is in

START_OF_WEEK_STARTING_FRI_DATE 
	First Day of Week starting Friday that DATE is in

END_OF_WEEK_STARTING_FRI_DATE   
	Last Day of Week starting Friday that DATE is in

START_OF_WEEK_STARTING_SAT_DATE 
	First Day of Week starting Saturday that DATE is in

END_OF_WEEK_STARTING_SAT_DATE   
	Last Day of Week starting Saturday that DATE is in

*** Sequence No columns are intended to allow easy offsets by
*** Quarter, Month, or Week for applications that need to look at
*** Last or Next Quarter, Month, or Week.  Thay can also be used to
*** generate dynamic cross tab results by Quarter, Month, or Week.

QUARTER_SEQ_NO                  
	Sequential Quarter number as offset from Quarter starting 1753/01/01

MONTH_SEQ_NO                    
	Sequential Month number as offset from Month starting 1753/01/01

WEEK_STARTING_SUN_SEQ_NO        
	Sequential Week number as offset from Week starting Sunday, 1753/01/07

WEEK_STARTING_MON_SEQ_NO        
	Sequential Week number as offset from Week starting Monday, 1753/01/01

WEEK_STARTING_TUE_SEQ_NO        
	Sequential Week number as offset from Week starting Tuesday, 1753/01/02

WEEK_STARTING_WED_SEQ_NO        
	Sequential Week number as offset from Week starting Wednesday, 1753/01/03

WEEK_STARTING_THU_SEQ_NO        
	Sequential Week number as offset from Week starting Thursday, 1753/01/04

WEEK_STARTING_FRI_SEQ_NO        
	Sequential Week number as offset from Week starting Friday, 1753/01/05

WEEK_STARTING_SAT_SEQ_NO        
	Sequential Week number as offset from Week starting Saturday, 1753/01/06

JULIAN_DATE                     
	Julian Date number as offset from noon on January 1, 4713 BCE
	to noon on day of DATE in system of Joseph Scaliger

MODIFIED_JULIAN_DATE            
	Modified Julian Date number as offset from midnight(00:00:00.000) on
	1858/11/17 to midnight(00:00:00.000) on day of DATE

ISO_DATE                        
	ISO 8601 Date in format YYYY-MM-DD, Example = 2004-02-29

ISO_YEAR_WEEK_NO                
	ISO 8601 year and week in format YYYYWW, Example = 200403

ISO_WEEK_NO                     
	ISO 8601 week of year in format WW, Example = 52

ISO_DAY_OF_WEEK                 
	ISO 8601 Day of week number, 
	Mon=1, Tue=2, Wed=3, Thu=4, Fri=5, Sat=6, Sun=7

ISO_YEAR_WEEK_NAME              
	ISO 8601 year and week in format YYYY-WNN, Example = 2004-W52

ISO_YEAR_WEEK_DAY_OF_WEEK_NAME  
	ISO 8601 year, week, and day of week in format YYYY-WNN-D,
	Example = 2004-W52-2

DATE_FORMAT_YYYY_MM_DD          
	Text date in format YYYY/MM/DD, Example = 2004/02/29

DATE_FORMAT_YYYY_M_D            
	Text date in format YYYY/M/D, Example = 2004/2/9

DATE_FORMAT_MM_DD_YYYY          
	Text date in format MM/DD/YYYY, Example = 06/05/2004

DATE_FORMAT_M_D_YYYY            
	Text date in format M/D/YYYY, Example = 6/5/2004

DATE_FORMAT_MMM_D_YYYY          
	Text date in format MMM D, YYYY, Example = Jan 4, 2006

DATE_FORMAT_MMMMMMMMM_D_YYYY    
	Text date in format MMMMMMMMM D, YYYY, Example = September 3, 2004

DATE_FORMAT_MM_DD_YY            
	Text date in format MM/DD/YY, Example = 06/05/97

DATE_FORMAT_M_D_YY              
	Text date in format M/D/YY, Example = 6/5/97

*/

returns  @DATE table 
(
[DATE_ID]				[int]		not null 
	primary key clustered,
[DATE]					[datetime]	not null ,
[NEXT_DAY_DATE]				[datetime]	not null ,
[YEAR]					[smallint]	not null ,
[YEAR_QUARTER]				[int]	not null ,
[YEAR_MONTH]				[int]		not null ,
[YEAR_DAY_OF_YEAR]			[int]		not null ,
[QUARTER]				[tinyint]	not null ,
[MONTH]					[tinyint]	not null ,
[DAY_OF_YEAR]				[smallint]	not null ,
[DAY_OF_MONTH]				[smallint]	not null ,
[DAY_OF_WEEK]				[tinyint]	not null ,

[YEAR_NAME]				[varchar] (4)	not null ,
[YEAR_QUARTER_NAME]			[varchar] (7)	not null ,
[YEAR_MONTH_NAME]			[varchar] (8)	not null ,
[YEAR_MONTH_NAME_LONG]			[varchar] (14)	not null ,
[QUARTER_NAME]				[varchar] (2)	not null ,
[MONTH_NAME]				[varchar] (3)	not null ,
[MONTH_NAME_LONG]			[varchar] (9)	not null ,
[WEEKDAY_NAME]				[varchar] (3)	not null ,
[WEEKDAY_NAME_LONG]			[varchar] (9)	not null ,

[START_OF_YEAR_DATE]			[datetime]	not null ,
[END_OF_YEAR_DATE]			[datetime]	not null ,
[START_OF_QUARTER_DATE]			[datetime]	not null ,
[END_OF_QUARTER_DATE]			[datetime]	not null ,
[START_OF_MONTH_DATE]			[datetime]	not null ,
[END_OF_MONTH_DATE]			[datetime]	not null ,

[START_OF_WEEK_STARTING_SUN_DATE]	[datetime]	not null ,
[END_OF_WEEK_STARTING_SUN_DATE]		[datetime]	not null ,
[START_OF_WEEK_STARTING_MON_DATE]	[datetime]	not null ,
[END_OF_WEEK_STARTING_MON_DATE]		[datetime]	not null ,
[START_OF_WEEK_STARTING_TUE_DATE]	[datetime]	not null ,
[END_OF_WEEK_STARTING_TUE_DATE]		[datetime]	not null ,
[START_OF_WEEK_STARTING_WED_DATE]	[datetime]	not null ,
[END_OF_WEEK_STARTING_WED_DATE]		[datetime]	not null ,
[START_OF_WEEK_STARTING_THU_DATE]	[datetime]	not null ,
[END_OF_WEEK_STARTING_THU_DATE]		[datetime]	not null ,
[START_OF_WEEK_STARTING_FRI_DATE]	[datetime]	not null ,
[END_OF_WEEK_STARTING_FRI_DATE]		[datetime]	not null ,
[START_OF_WEEK_STARTING_SAT_DATE]	[datetime]	not null ,
[END_OF_WEEK_STARTING_SAT_DATE]		[datetime]	not null ,

[QUARTER_SEQ_NO]			[int]		not null ,
[MONTH_SEQ_NO]				[int]		not null ,

[WEEK_STARTING_SUN_SEQ_NO]		[int]		not null ,
[WEEK_STARTING_MON_SEQ_NO]		[int]		not null ,
[WEEK_STARTING_TUE_SEQ_NO]		[int]		not null ,
[WEEK_STARTING_WED_SEQ_NO]		[int]		not null ,
[WEEK_STARTING_THU_SEQ_NO]		[int]		not null ,
[WEEK_STARTING_FRI_SEQ_NO]		[int]		not null ,
[WEEK_STARTING_SAT_SEQ_NO]		[int]		not null ,

[JULIAN_DATE]				[int]		not null ,
[MODIFIED_JULIAN_DATE]			[int]		not null ,

[ISO_DATE]				[varchar](10)	not null ,
[ISO_YEAR_WEEK_NO]			[int]		not null ,
[ISO_WEEK_NO]				[smallint]	not null ,
[ISO_DAY_OF_WEEK]			[tinyint]	not null ,
[ISO_YEAR_WEEK_NAME]			[varchar](8)	not null ,
[ISO_YEAR_WEEK_DAY_OF_WEEK_NAME]	[varchar](10)	not null ,

[DATE_FORMAT_YYYY_MM_DD]		[varchar](10)	not null ,
[DATE_FORMAT_YYYY_M_D]			[varchar](10)	not null ,
[DATE_FORMAT_MM_DD_YYYY]		[varchar](10)	not null ,
[DATE_FORMAT_M_D_YYYY]			[varchar](10)	not null ,
[DATE_FORMAT_MMM_D_YYYY]		[varchar](12)	not null ,
[DATE_FORMAT_MMMMMMMMM_D_YYYY]		[varchar](18)	not null ,
[DATE_FORMAT_MM_DD_YY]			[varchar](8)	not null ,
[DATE_FORMAT_M_D_YY]			[varchar](8)	not null 
) 
as
begin
declare @cr			varchar(2)
select @cr			= char(13)+Char(10)
declare @ErrorMessage		varchar(400)
declare @START_DATE		datetime
declare @END_DATE		datetime
declare @LOW_DATE	datetime

declare	@start_no	int
declare	@end_no	int

-- Verify @FIRST_DATE is not null 
if @FIRST_DATE is null
	begin
	select @ErrorMessage =
		'@FIRST_DATE cannot be null'
	goto Error_Exit
	end

-- Verify @LAST_DATE is not null 
if @LAST_DATE is null
	begin
	select @ErrorMessage =
		'@LAST_DATE cannot be null'
	goto Error_Exit
	end

-- Verify @FIRST_DATE is not before 1754-01-01
IF  @FIRST_DATE < '17540101'	begin
	select @ErrorMessage =
		'@FIRST_DATE cannot before 1754-01-01'+
		', @FIRST_DATE = '+
		isnull(convert(varchar(40),@FIRST_DATE,121),'NULL')
	goto Error_Exit
	end

-- Verify @LAST_DATE is not after 9997-12-31
IF  @LAST_DATE > '99971231'	begin
	select @ErrorMessage =
		'@LAST_DATE cannot be after 9997-12-31'+
		', @LAST_DATE = '+
		isnull(convert(varchar(40),@LAST_DATE,121),'NULL')
	goto Error_Exit
	end

-- Verify @FIRST_DATE is not after @LAST_DATE
if @FIRST_DATE > @LAST_DATE
	begin
	select @ErrorMessage =
		'@FIRST_DATE cannot be after @LAST_DATE'+
		', @FIRST_DATE = '+
		isnull(convert(varchar(40),@FIRST_DATE,121),'NULL')+
		', @LAST_DATE = '+
		isnull(convert(varchar(40),@LAST_DATE,121),'NULL')
	goto Error_Exit
	end

-- Set @START_DATE = @FIRST_DATE at midnight
select @START_DATE	= dateadd(dd,datediff(dd,0,@FIRST_DATE),0)
-- Set @END_DATE = @LAST_DATE at midnight
select @END_DATE	= dateadd(dd,datediff(dd,0,@LAST_DATE),0)
-- Set @LOW_DATE = earliest possible SQL Server datetime
select @LOW_DATE	= convert(datetime,'17530101')

-- Find the number of day from 1753-01-01 to @START_DATE and @END_DATE
select	@start_no	= datediff(dd,@LOW_DATE,@START_DATE) ,
	@end_no	= datediff(dd,@LOW_DATE,@END_DATE)

-- Declare number tables
declare @num1 table (NUMBER int not null primary key clustered)
declare @num2 table (NUMBER int not null primary key clustered)
declare @num3 table (NUMBER int not null primary key clustered)

-- Declare table of ISO Week ranges
declare @ISO_WEEK table
(
[ISO_WEEK_YEAR] 		int		not null
	primary key clustered,
[ISO_WEEK_YEAR_START_DATE]	datetime	not null,
[ISO_WEEK_YEAR_END_DATE]	Datetime	not null
)

-- Find rows needed in number tables
declare	@rows_needed		int
declare	@rows_needed_root	int
select	@rows_needed		= @end_no - @start_no + 1
select  @rows_needed		=
		case
		when @rows_needed < 10
		then 10
		else @rows_needed
		end
select	@rows_needed_root	= convert(int,ceiling(sqrt(@rows_needed)))

-- Load number 0 to 16
insert into @num1 (NUMBER)
select NUMBER = 0 union all select  1 union all select  2 union all
select          3 union all select  4 union all select  5 union all
select          6 union all select  7 union all select  8 union all
select          9 union all select 10 union all select 11 union all
select         12 union all select 13 union all select 14 union all
select         15
order by
	1
-- Load table with numbers zero thru square root of the number of rows needed +1
insert into @num2 (NUMBER)
select
	NUMBER = a.NUMBER+(16*b.NUMBER)+(256*c.NUMBER)
from
	@num1 a cross join @num1 b cross join @num1 c
where
	a.NUMBER+(16*b.NUMBER)+(256*c.NUMBER) <
	@rows_needed_root
order by
	1

-- Load table with the number of rows needed for the date range
insert into @num3 (NUMBER)
select
	NUMBER = a.NUMBER+(@rows_needed_root*b.NUMBER)
from
	@num2 a
	cross join
	@num2 b
where
	a.NUMBER+(@rows_needed_root*b.NUMBER) < @rows_needed
order by
	1

declare	@iso_start_year	int
declare	@iso_end_year	int

select	@iso_start_year	= datepart(year,dateadd(year,-1,@start_date))
select	@iso_end_year	= datepart(year,dateadd(year,1,@end_date))

-- Load table with start and end dates for ISO week years
insert into @ISO_WEEK
	(
	[ISO_WEEK_YEAR],
	[ISO_WEEK_YEAR_START_DATE],
	[ISO_WEEK_YEAR_END_DATE]
	)
select
	[ISO_WEEK_YEAR] = a.NUMBER,
	[0ISO_WEEK_YEAR_START_DATE]	=
		dateadd(dd,(datediff(dd,@LOW_DATE,
		dateadd(day,3,dateadd(year,a.[NUMBER]-1900,0))
		)/7)*7,@LOW_DATE),
	[ISO_WEEK_YEAR_END_DATE]	=
		dateadd(dd,-1,dateadd(dd,(datediff(dd,@LOW_DATE,
		dateadd(day,3,dateadd(year,a.[NUMBER]+1-1900,0))
		)/7)*7,@LOW_DATE))
from
	(
	select
		NUMBER = NUMBER+@iso_start_year
	from
		@num3
	where
		NUMBER+@iso_start_year <= @iso_end_year
	) a
order by
	a.NUMBER

-- Load Date table
insert into @DATE
select
	[DATE_ID]			= a.[DATE_ID] ,
	[DATE]				= a.[DATE] ,

	[NEXT_DAY_DATE]			=
		dateadd(day,1,a.[DATE]) ,

	[YEAR]			=
		datepart(year,a.[DATE]) ,
	[YEAR_QUARTER]		=
		(10*datepart(year,a.[DATE]))+datepart(quarter,a.[DATE]) ,

	[YEAR_MONTH]		=
		(100*datepart(year,a.[DATE]))+datepart(month,a.[DATE]) ,
	[YEAR_DAY_OF_YEAR]		=
		(1000*datepart(year,a.[DATE]))+
		datediff(dd,dateadd(yy,datediff(yy,0,a.[DATE]),0),a.[DATE])+1 ,
	[QUARTER]		=
		datepart(quarter,a.[DATE]) ,
	[MONTH]		=
		datepart(month,a.[DATE]) ,
	[DAY_OF_YEAR]			=
		datediff(dd,dateadd(yy,datediff(yy,0,a.[DATE]),0),a.[DATE])+1 ,
	[DAY_OF_MONTH]			=
		datepart(day,a.[DATE]) ,
	[DAY_OF_WEEK]		=
		-- Sunday = 1, Monday = 2, ,,,Saturday = 7
		(datediff(dd,'17530107',a.[DATE])%7)+1  ,
	[YEAR_NAME]		=
		datename(year,a.[DATE]) ,
	[YEAR_QUARTER_NAME]	=
		datename(year,a.[DATE])+' Q'+datename(quarter,a.[DATE]) ,
	[YEAR_MONTH_NAME]	=
		datename(year,a.[DATE])+' '+left(datename(month,a.[DATE]),3) ,
	[YEAR_MONTH_NAME_LONG]	=
		datename(year,a.[DATE])+' '+datename(month,a.[DATE]) ,
	[QUARTER_NAME]		=
		'Q'+datename(quarter,a.[DATE]) ,
	[MONTH_NAME]		=
		left(datename(month,a.[DATE]),3) ,
	[MONTH_NAME_LONG]	=
		datename(month,a.[DATE]) ,
	[WEEKDAY_NAME]		=
		left(datename(weekday,a.[DATE]),3) ,
	[WEEKDAY_NAME_LONG]	=
		datename(weekday,a.[DATE]),

	[START_OF_YEAR_DATE]	=
		dateadd(year,datediff(year,0,a.[DATE]),0) ,
	[END_OF_YEAR_DATE]	=
		dateadd(day,-1,dateadd(year,datediff(year,0,a.[DATE])+1,0)) ,

	[START_OF_QUARTER_DATE]	=
		dateadd(quarter,datediff(quarter,0,a.[DATE]),0) ,
	[END_OF_QUARTER_DATE]	=
		dateadd(day,-1,dateadd(quarter,datediff(quarter,0,a.[DATE])+1,0)) ,

	[START_OF_MONTH_DATE]	=
		dateadd(month,datediff(month,0,a.[DATE]),0) ,
	[END_OF_MONTH_DATE]	=
		dateadd(day,-1,dateadd(month,datediff(month,0,a.[DATE])+1,0)),

	[START_OF_WEEK_STARTING_SUN_DATE]	=
		dateadd(dd,(datediff(dd,'17530107',a.[DATE])/7)*7,'17530107'),
	[END_OF_WEEK_STARTING_SUN_DATE]		=
		dateadd(dd,((datediff(dd,'17530107',a.[DATE])/7)*7)+6,'17530107'),

	[START_OF_WEEK_STARTING_MON_DATE]	=
		dateadd(dd,(datediff(dd,'17530101',a.[DATE])/7)*7,'17530101'),
	[END_OF_WEEK_STARTING_MON_DATE]		=
		dateadd(dd,((datediff(dd,'17530101',a.[DATE])/7)*7)+6,'17530101'),

	[START_OF_WEEK_STARTING_TUE_DATE]	=
		dateadd(dd,(datediff(dd,'17530102',a.[DATE])/7)*7,'17530102'),
	[END_OF_WEEK_STARTING_TUE_DATE]		=
		dateadd(dd,((datediff(dd,'17530102',a.[DATE])/7)*7)+6,'17530102'),

	[START_OF_WEEK_STARTING_WED_DATE]	=
		dateadd(dd,(datediff(dd,'17530103',a.[DATE])/7)*7,'17530103'),
	[END_OF_WEEK_STARTING_WED_DATE]		=
		dateadd(dd,((datediff(dd,'17530103',a.[DATE])/7)*7)+6,'17530103'),

	[START_OF_WEEK_STARTING_THU_DATE]	=
		dateadd(dd,(datediff(dd,'17530104',a.[DATE])/7)*7,'17530104'),
	[END_OF_WEEK_STARTING_THU_DATE]		=
		dateadd(dd,((datediff(dd,'17530104',a.[DATE])/7)*7)+6,'17530104'),

	[START_OF_WEEK_STARTING_FRI_DATE]	=
		dateadd(dd,(datediff(dd,'17530105',a.[DATE])/7)*7,'17530105'),
	[END_OF_WEEK_STARTING_FRI_DATE]		=
		dateadd(dd,((datediff(dd,'17530105',a.[DATE])/7)*7)+6,'17530105'),

	[START_OF_WEEK_STARTING_SAT_DATE]	=
		dateadd(dd,(datediff(dd,'17530106',a.[DATE])/7)*7,'17530106'),
	[END_OF_WEEK_STARTING_SAT_DATE]		=
		dateadd(dd,((datediff(dd,'17530106',a.[DATE])/7)*7)+6,'17530106'),

	[QUARTER_SEQ_NO]			= 
		datediff(quarter,@LOW_DATE,a.[DATE]),
	[MONTH_SEQ_NO]				=
		datediff(month,@LOW_DATE,a.[DATE]),

	[WEEK_STARTING_SUN_SEQ_NO]		=
		datediff(day,'17530107',a.[DATE])/7,
	[WEEK_STARTING_MON_SEQ_NO]		=
		datediff(day,'17530101',a.[DATE])/7,
	[WEEK_STARTING_TUE_SEQ_NO]		=
		datediff(day,'17530102',a.[DATE])/7,
	[WEEK_STARTING_WED_SEQ_NO]		=
		datediff(day,'17530103',a.[DATE])/7,
	[WEEK_STARTING_THU_SEQ_NO]		=
		datediff(day,'17530104',a.[DATE])/7,
	[WEEK_STARTING_FRI_SEQ_NO]		=
		datediff(day,'17530105',a.[DATE])/7,
	[WEEK_STARTING_SAT_SEQ_NO]		=
		datediff(day,'17530106',a.[DATE])/7,

	[JULIAN_DATE]			=
		datediff(day,@LOW_DATE,a.[DATE])+2361331,
	[MODIFIED_JULIAN_DATE]		=
		datediff(day,'18581117',a.[DATE]),
--/*

	[ISO_DATE]		=
		replace(convert(char(10),a.[DATE],111),'/','-') ,

	[ISO_YEAR_WEEK_NO]		=
		(100*b.[ISO_WEEK_YEAR])+
		(datediff(dd,b.[ISO_WEEK_YEAR_START_DATE],a.[DATE])/7)+1 ,

	[ISO_WEEK_NO]		=
		(datediff(dd,b.[ISO_WEEK_YEAR_START_DATE],a.[DATE])/7)+1 ,

	[ISO_DAY_OF_WEEK]		=
		-- Sunday = 1, Monday = 2, ,,,Saturday = 7
		(datediff(dd,@LOW_DATE,a.[DATE])%7)+1  ,

	[ISO_YEAR_WEEK_NAME]		=
		convert(varchar(4),b.[ISO_WEEK_YEAR])+'-W'+
		right('00'+convert(varchar(2),(datediff(dd,b.[ISO_WEEK_YEAR_START_DATE],a.[DATE])/7)+1),2) ,

	[ISO_YEAR_WEEK_DAY_OF_WEEK_NAME]		=
		convert(varchar(4),b.[ISO_WEEK_YEAR])+'-W'+
		right('00'+convert(varchar(2),(datediff(dd,b.[ISO_WEEK_YEAR_START_DATE],a.[DATE])/7)+1),2) +
		'-'+convert(varchar(1),(datediff(dd,@LOW_DATE,a.[DATE])%7)+1) ,
--*/
	[DATE_FORMAT_YYYY_MM_DD]		=
		convert(char(10),a.[DATE],111) ,
	[DATE_FORMAT_YYYY_M_D]		= 
		convert(varchar(10),
		convert(varchar(4),year(a.[DATE]))+'/'+
		convert(varchar(2),month(a.[DATE]))+'/'+
		convert(varchar(2),day(a.[DATE]))),
	[DATE_FORMAT_MM_DD_YYYY]		= 
		convert(char(10),a.[DATE],101) ,
	[DATE_FORMAT_M_D_YYYY]		= 
		convert(varchar(10),
		convert(varchar(2),month(a.[DATE]))+'/'+
		convert(varchar(2),day(a.[DATE]))+'/'+
		convert(varchar(4),year(a.[DATE]))),
	[DATE_FORMAT_MMM_D_YYYY]		= 
		convert(varchar(12),
		left(datename(month,a.[DATE]),3)+' '+
		convert(varchar(2),day(a.[DATE]))+', '+
		convert(varchar(4),year(a.[DATE]))),
	[DATE_FORMAT_MMMMMMMMM_D_YYYY]	= 
		convert(varchar(18),
		datename(month,a.[DATE])+' '+
		convert(varchar(2),day(a.[DATE]))+', '+
		convert(varchar(4),year(a.[DATE]))),
	[DATE_FORMAT_MM_DD_YY]		=
		convert(char(8),a.[DATE],1) ,
	[DATE_FORMAT_M_D_YY]		= 
		convert(varchar(8),
		convert(varchar(2),month(a.[DATE]))+'/'+
		convert(varchar(2),day(a.[DATE]))+'/'+
		right(convert(varchar(4),year(a.[DATE])),2))
from
	(
	-- Derived table is all dates needed for date range
	select	top 100 percent
		[DATE_ID]	= aa.[NUMBER],
		[DATE]		=
			dateadd(dd,aa.[NUMBER],@LOW_DATE)
	from
		(
		select
			NUMBER = NUMBER+@start_no 
		from
			@num3
		where
			NUMBER+@start_no <= @end_no
		) aa
	order by
		aa.[NUMBER]
	) a
	join
	-- Match each date to the proper ISO week year
	@ISO_WEEK b
	on a.[DATE] between 
		b.[ISO_WEEK_YEAR_START_DATE] and 
		b.[ISO_WEEK_YEAR_END_DATE]
order by
	a.[DATE_ID]

return

Error_Exit:

-- Return a pseudo error message by trying to
-- convert an error message string to an int.
-- This method is used because the error displays
-- the string it was trying to convert, and so the
-- calling application sees a formatted error message.

declare @error int

set @error = convert(int,@cr+@cr+
'*******************************************************************'+@cr+
'* Error in function F_TABLE_DATE:'+@cr+'* '+
isnull(@ErrorMessage,'Unknown Error')+@cr+
'*******************************************************************'+@cr+@cr)

return

end


GO
SET QUOTED_IDENTIFIER OFF 
GO
SET ANSI_NULLS ON 
GO

GRANT  SELECT  ON [dbo].[F_TABLE_DATE]  TO [public]
GO
set dateformat ydm
go
print 'Checksum with ydm'
go
select
	[Checksum] = checksum_agg(binary_checksum(*))
from
	dbo.F_TABLE_DATE ( '20000101','20101231' )
go
set dateformat ymd
go
print 'Checksum with ymd'
go
select
	[Checksum] = checksum_agg(binary_checksum(*))
from
	dbo.F_TABLE_DATE ( '20000101','20101231' )
go
set dateformat ymd
go
-- Sample select for date range
select *
from
	dbo.F_TABLE_DATE ( '20000101','20101231' )
order by 1











CODO ERGO SUM

Edited by - Michael Valentine Jones on 07/05/2012 02:35:54

khtan
In (Som, Ni, Yak)

Singapore
17681 Posts

Posted - 02/09/2006 :  22:00:24  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
is there a NEXT_WEEKDAY_DATE in there ?
[EDIT]
I meant NON WEEKEND DATE
[/EDIT]
----------------------------------
'KH'

everything that has a beginning has an end

Edited by - khtan on 02/09/2006 22:13:22
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Michael Valentine Jones
Yak DBA Kernel (pronounced Colonel)

USA
7020 Posts

Posted - 02/09/2006 :  22:18:53  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by khtan

is there a NEXT_WEEKDAY_DATE in there ?

----------------------------------
'KH'

everything that has a beginning has an end



No, that is something I left out intentionally, because I wasn't sure that everyone had the same idea about what a week day was.

If you need to do this a lot, you would be better off with a special built function. If you need it in your calendar table, just add it to your version of F_TABLE_DATE.

If your idea of a weekday is Monday to Friday, this code should give you the next weekday date.


declare @start_date	datetime
declare @end_date	datetime
select @start_date	= getdate()+1
select @end_date	= @start_date+7

select
	NEXT_WEEKDAY_DATE = min([DATE])
from 
	dbo.F_TABLE_DATE ( @start_date,@end_date)
where
	[DAY_OF_WEEK]	 between 2 and 6



Edit: Changed code to make it a little faster with fewer dates.






CODO ERGO SUM

Edited by - Michael Valentine Jones on 02/09/2006 22:29:35
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khtan
In (Som, Ni, Yak)

Singapore
17681 Posts

Posted - 02/09/2006 :  22:22:16  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yup. Points taken. Thanks for the excellent function

----------------------------------
'KH'

everything that has a beginning has an end
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Kristen
Test

United Kingdom
22431 Posts

Posted - 02/10/2006 :  03:56:01  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
"-- Return a pesudo error message by trying to
-- convert an error message string to an int.
-- This method is used because the error displays
-- the string it was trying to convert, and so the
-- calling application sees a formatted error message
"

I like the sound of that ... I've been looking for a way some code to steal to "return" an error from a Function.

Kristen

Edited by - Kristen on 02/10/2006 13:15:35
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spirit1
Cybernetic Yak Master

Slovenia
11751 Posts

Posted - 02/10/2006 :  05:22:30  Show Profile  Visit spirit1's Homepage  Reply with Quote
great function MVJ!

one remark...
if either of the input dates exceeds the lower/upper limit this is returned:
Server: Msg 242, Level 16, State 3, Line 2
The conversion of a char data type to a datetime data type resulted in an out-of-range datetime value.

so i guess that you don't even have to handle those errors in the function, no?

Go with the flow & have fun! Else fight the flow
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Kristen
Test

United Kingdom
22431 Posts

Posted - 02/10/2006 :  06:23:19  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
"so i guess that you don't even have to handle those errors in the function"

If you do trap it then just call my brand spanking new Crash function!!

CREATE FUNCTION dbo.MyCrashFunction
(
	@strMessage	varCHAR(8000)
)
RETURNS int
BEGIN
RETURN	convert(int, CHAR(13)+CHAR(10)+CHAR(13)+CHAR(10)+
'*******************************************************************'+CHAR(13)+CHAR(10)+
COALESCE(@strMessage,'Unknown Error')+CHAR(13)+CHAR(10)+
'*******************************************************************'+CHAR(13)+CHAR(10))

END
GO

-- Test:
SELECT dbo.MyCrashFunction('Something terrible happened')
GO

which gives:

Server: Msg 245, Level 16, State 1, Procedure MyCrashFunction, Line 7
Syntax error converting the varchar value '

*******************************************************************
Something terrible happened
*******************************************************************
' to a column of data type int.

Kristen
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Michael Valentine Jones
Yak DBA Kernel (pronounced Colonel)

USA
7020 Posts

Posted - 02/10/2006 :  09:50:27  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by spirit1

great function MVJ!

one remark...
if either of the input dates exceeds the lower/upper limit this is returned:
Server: Msg 242, Level 16, State 3, Line 2
The conversion of a char data type to a datetime data type resulted in an out-of-range datetime value.

so i guess that you don't even have to handle those errors in the function, no?

Go with the flow & have fun! Else fight the flow



Actually, there are valid datetime values that the function cannot process. It rejects dates before 1754-01-01 and after 9997-12-31, because I didn't want to spend a lot of time programming around edge contitions for ISO Weeks. I figured that not being able to load years 1753, 9998, and 9999 would not be a huge drawback for most applications.



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Michael Valentine Jones
Yak DBA Kernel (pronounced Colonel)

USA
7020 Posts

Posted - 02/10/2006 :  11:45:48  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Kristen
..just call my brand spanking new Crash function...


Didn't take you long to steal my idea!

I bet in a few days I'll see a post about Kristen's great techinique for returning error messages from UDFs.

Small minds copy ideas but great minds steal them.



CODO ERGO SUM
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Kristen
Test

United Kingdom
22431 Posts

Posted - 02/10/2006 :  13:16:20  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
"Small minds copy ideas but great minds steal them."

My earlier post (02/10/2006 : 03:56:01) wasn't clear enough. So I've edited it!

Kristen
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rockmoose
SQL Natt Alfen

Sweden
3279 Posts

Posted - 02/10/2006 :  16:25:02  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That is very very nice!
Thank You MVJ!

We will implement a dw pretty soon, or at least improve on the existing, I sense that the function will save me some coding.
Will store the values in a table though.

--*/
(yes the crash function to, Kristen )
--*/

rockmoose
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Michael Valentine Jones
Yak DBA Kernel (pronounced Colonel)

USA
7020 Posts

Posted - 02/10/2006 :  17:10:38  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by rockmoose
...We will implement a dw pretty soon, or at least improve on the existing, I sense that the function will save me some coding.
Will store the values in a table though...

A lot of the work I did on this was for a data warehouse that I did years ago. I saw lots of examples that had a few of these ideas, but I wanted a Swiss Army Knife date dimension, the one with 60 blades, so I developed this.

As I said in the comments in the code, this function was meant to load a table. However, if you need it to load a small temporary table, or to use it directly, it works just fine, and is fairly fast for small result sets. You can generate a result set with as little as one row.

Once you load a table, I found it was very useful to create a view that selects the row for the current day. It saves a lot of work in coding to be able to get the data for the current day directly.






CODO ERGO SUM
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rockmoose
SQL Natt Alfen

Sweden
3279 Posts

Posted - 02/10/2006 :  17:30:02  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yes, this was the most comprehensive calender function I've seen yet.

Just got to remove some columns before I let any users see the calendar table.
The less options, the less questions [;]


rockmoose
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klaus2000
Starting Member

3 Posts

Posted - 02/22/2006 :  06:31:00  Show Profile  Reply with Quote

receive the following message: (sqlServer2005 - management studio)


Msg 207, Level 16, State 1, Procedure F_TABLE_DATE, Line 502
Invalid column name 'ISO_WEEK_YEAR'.
Msg 15151, Level 16, State 1, Line 2
Cannot find the object 'F_TABLE_DATE', because it does not exist or you do not have permission.
Msg 208, Level 16, State 1, Line 3
Invalid object name 'dbo.F_TABLE_DATE'.

any ideas?






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Michael Valentine Jones
Yak DBA Kernel (pronounced Colonel)

USA
7020 Posts

Posted - 02/22/2006 :  11:51:00  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by klaus2000


receive the following message: (sqlServer2005 - management studio)


Msg 207, Level 16, State 1, Procedure F_TABLE_DATE, Line 502
Invalid column name 'ISO_WEEK_YEAR'.
Msg 15151, Level 16, State 1, Line 2
Cannot find the object 'F_TABLE_DATE', because it does not exist or you do not have permission.
Msg 208, Level 16, State 1, Line 3
Invalid object name 'dbo.F_TABLE_DATE'.

any ideas?




I just copied the script from the posted code, and it ran fine from SQL 2000 Query Analyzer.

Sounds like it did not compile when you ran it, for some reason.

Did you try it in SQL 2000?





CODO ERGO SUM
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klaus2000
Starting Member

3 Posts

Posted - 02/22/2006 :  15:21:57  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
no sql 2k available anymore - migrated everything to ss2005.
any plans from your side to have a deeper look at that issue in the near future?
btw - thanx for the quick response1

I just copied the script from the posted code, and it ran fine from SQL 2000 Query Analyzer.

Sounds like it did not compile when you ran it, for some reason.

Did you try it in SQL 2000?





CODO ERGO SUM
[/quote]
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khtan
In (Som, Ni, Yak)

Singapore
17681 Posts

Posted - 02/22/2006 :  17:36:14  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It seems that SQL Server 2005 does not like the table prefix on the column alias.
-- Load table with start and end dates for ISO week years
...
order by
	a.[ISO_WEEK_YEAR]


----------------------------------
'KH'

It is inevitable
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Kristen
Test

United Kingdom
22431 Posts

Posted - 02/23/2006 :  05:11:02  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
In the ORDER BY?

That's a bit scary isn't it?

Kristen [having not yet migrated anything to SQL2k5]
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khtan
In (Som, Ni, Yak)

Singapore
17681 Posts

Posted - 02/23/2006 :  05:16:13  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Come to think of it, this is logical as A column alias can be the computation result of columns from different table.

----------------------------------
'KH'

It is inevitable
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Kristen
Test

United Kingdom
22431 Posts

Posted - 02/23/2006 :  05:25:54  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ah .. I've read it more carefully.

The column [ISO_WEEK_YEAR] is not present in the table alias [A] - so should raise a syntax error in SQL 2k too I reckon!

I bet having stuck my neck out it will get cut off now

Kristen
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khtan
In (Som, Ni, Yak)

Singapore
17681 Posts

Posted - 02/23/2006 :  07:47:47  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
But SQL Server 2000 let this passed

----------------------------------
'KH'

It is inevitable
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