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 Transact-SQL (2005)
 Compare two fields in two databases
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shabar
Starting Member

4 Posts

Posted - 09/09/2010 :  07:12:12  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi

How to compare two fields in two separate SQL server databases.


Cheers

Shabar

sakets_2000
Flowing Fount of Yak Knowledge

India
1472 Posts

Posted - 09/09/2010 :  07:37:59  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
what comparison do you want to run ? sample data and output will help.
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shabar
Starting Member

4 Posts

Posted - 09/09/2010 :  15:10:39  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by sakets_2000

what comparison do you want to run ? sample data and output will help.



Hi

Basically I want to run one SQL script to compare two tables fields in two separate SQL sever databases.

Say I have table T1 in database DB1 and table T2 in database DB2.


Hope this make sense


Cheers

Shabar






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shabar
Starting Member

4 Posts

Posted - 09/13/2010 :  15:33:38  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi

Can we implement following format to access two databases

quote:

select *
from currentDB_table cdb
, remoteDB_table@REMOTEDBLINK rdb
where cdb.field1 = rdb.field1




Cheers

Shabar
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Bustaz Kool
Flowing Fount of Yak Knowledge

USA
1645 Posts

Posted - 09/13/2010 :  19:21:07  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
If the two databases are on the same SQL Server instance, you can simply use a three part name for the "remote" database:

select here.*
from MyLocalTable here
inner join MyOtherDatabase.dbo.MyOtherTable there
on here.MyColumn = there.MyColumn

If the other database is on another instance, you could define a linked server relationship to that database and then use a four part name (LinkedServerName.Dataqbase.Schema.Object) to access the remote item.

=======================================
In all life one should comfort the afflicted, but verily, also, one should afflict the comfortable, and especially when they are comfortably, contentedly, even happily wrong. -John Kenneth Galbraith, economist (1908-2006)
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shabar
Starting Member

4 Posts

Posted - 09/14/2010 :  06:14:57  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Bustaz Kool

If the two databases are on the same SQL Server instance, you can simply use a three part name for the "remote" database:

select here.*
from MyLocalTable here
inner join MyOtherDatabase.dbo.MyOtherTable there
on here.MyColumn = there.MyColumn

If the other database is on another instance, you could define a linked server relationship to that database and then use a four part name (LinkedServerName.Dataqbase.Schema.Object) to access the remote item.

=======================================
In all life one should comfort the afflicted, but verily, also, one should afflict the comfortable, and especially when they are comfortably, contentedly, even happily wrong. -John Kenneth Galbraith, economist (1908-2006)




Thanks very much Bustaz Kool

It's great


Cheers

Shabar
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Bustaz Kool
Flowing Fount of Yak Knowledge

USA
1645 Posts

Posted - 09/14/2010 :  17:19:25  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
If the two databases are on the same SQL Server instance, you can simply use a three part name for the "remote" database:

select here.*
from MyLocalTable here
inner join MyOtherDatabase.dbo.MyOtherTable there
on here.MyColumn = there.MyColumn

If the other database is on another instance, you could define a linked server relationship to that database and then use a four part name (LinkedServerName.Dataqbase.Schema.Object) to access the remote item.

=======================================
In all life one should comfort the afflicted, but verily, also, one should afflict the comfortable, and especially when they are comfortably, contentedly, even happily wrong. -John Kenneth Galbraith, economist (1908-2006)
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